pigs in a blanket + mustard dipping sauce.

What is it they say about not needing to see how sausages get made? Well, you don’t need to see how these get made. There’s really not much to them: you buy a two packages of hot dogs (good quality, please), thaw some puff pastry, whip up some mustard sauce to go with, and there you have it. Instant addictive appetizers. And they are just as happy at a party as they are on a sunday afternoon watching football with you. 

Taken from Nigella Kitchen: Recipes from the Heart of the Home by Nigella Lawson. Of which I have an autographed copy I obtained during her book tour late in 2011, marking the first time I met my home cooking heroine.

Pigs in a Blanket + Mustard Dipping Sauce

for the pigs:

  • 1 package ready rolled puff pastry sheets (gives 2 sheets, thawed if frozen. i like to thaw mine overnight in the refrigerator)
  • 1 egg
  • 2 packages hot dogs (for a total of 16 regular-length hot dogs)

for the dipping sauce:

  • scant 1/2 cup whole grain spicy mustard
  • scant 1/2 cup Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons sour cream

Preheat the oven to 425˚F. Roll our one of the rectangular puff pastry sheets to make it just a little bit thinner, stretching the long side rather than the short side as you roll. Cut the rectangle into quarters, then cut each rectangle in half lengthwise, to give 8 small pastry strips in total. What you should be able to do is take these pieces and wrap them snugly around each of your hot dogs.

Beat the egg in a small bowl and paint each pastry section with the egg wash. Sit a hot dog horizontally on the left-hand side of one of the pieces of pastry and roll it up until it just seals. Then do the same thing with the remaining 7 pastry strips.

Cut each rolled hot dog into 4 small pieces, pressing the pastry back around the sausage if it comes loose (and it will do this on occasion.) Then place on a parchment-lined lipped baking sheet with the sealed bit down to prevent it springing open.

Paint the hot dogs in blankets with the egg wash, and put them in the oven for 15-20 minutes, checking after the 15-minute mark; pastry can burn easily if you’re not careful. The pastry should have puffed up a little and turned golden. You can get on with the other sheet of pastry while the first lot of hot dogs are cooking and repeat the process with the remaining hot dogs.

Mix together the mustards and sour cream and put in little bowls. Or, rather, just one medium sized bowl.

Put the cooked pigs, now in their warm little blankets, on to a plate and serve warm with the dipping sauce on the side.

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13 Comments on "pigs in a blanket + mustard dipping sauce."

  1. Penny Gold says:

    Could you give a little more direction? I’ve never made these, but have a party coming up next week for which they’d be great. Oven temperature? How long to bake? And is there anything special about wrapping the hotdogs–e.g., how many layers of puff pastry? Thanks!

    • shannon says:

      Hi Penny,

      Sorry about that! you caught me in the middle of posting this, and I hadn’t yet gotten the actual instructions down. They are updated as of now.
      And to answer your question: nothing special about wrapping the hot dogs, although I always run into the puff pastry starting to “shrink” back a little when i try to roll them. Once you cut the pieces, try rolling them out a bit more if they’re difficult to wrap around. Enjoy!

  2. Hi, this is a great post! Thanks..

  3. michelle says:

    Can these be frozen? Or made in advance and reheated the next day?

    • shannon says:

      I don’t know if i would refreeze puff pastry after thawing if they had not been cooked yet. I worry less about the puffing and more about possible bacteria from being at room temperature. I have made these and reheated the leftovers the next day by warming them in a 200˚F oven until heated through. They turn out good enough for leftovers, but for parties and guests, I prefer them the day of.
      You could make these up and stick them in the refrigerator (uncooked) for a few hours with no issues. Then bake them when the party’s about to start.

  4. Yum! I love pigs in a blanket. As do my husband and my kids. I’m sure they wish I’d make them weekly (sooo not happening! Despite all the baking I do, I prefer the rest of our food to be SOMEWHAT nutritious.)

    Last Super Bowl somebody brought over some merguez sausages, and I made some with them. Now THOSE were truly awesome!!

    (And just this afternoon a friend reminded me that it’s time to start thinking about out Super Bowl party.)

    • shannon says:

      i like a balance here as well: we, yes, have lots of cookies and baked goods due to the blog, but everything else i eat is healthy side of things, for sure. It’s a balance, but sometimes you have to give into pigs in a blanket. Kids can be so persuasive. :)

      Merguez sausage pigs in a blanket? I never even thought about that…i would love those, and probably with every fiber of my being.

      do you all do a super bowl party? we’re going to recipe-chat closer to the event; i love to hear what other people do for the Big Game, like if they stay super party food or go for something more upscale, etc. always fun to hear. I wanted to do an Oscars party, but it would actually only be me at said party, so…i still may do it.

      • We used to have big Super Bowl parties, with lots of people, and I’d make a REDICULOUS amount of food. The last few years we’ve kept it to just a few friends, and I make a slightly less rediculous amount of food.

        Last year I made a big pot of chili, and had a few munchies — pigs in a blanket, salsa & chips, sugar cookie bars.

        I’m thinking for this year of just doing a bunch of finger food — pigs in a blanket (those are a must!), buffalo & bbq wings, not sure what else. I’ll have to think about it, it’s coming up so soon! (I don’t even watch the game – don’t like football – so for me it’s ALL about the food.)

        Or I could just be lazy and have my husband pick up a few pizzas ;)

        • shannon says:

          we’ve done the same: a few years we had huge parties, but then recently it’s just a smattering of people (that i still make tons of food for, somehow). Those are great ideas, and so like, perfect if you want something hearty or just snacky, and i like that sort of variety. i’m taking notes. :)

          i started to say i watched the game, but i don’t; unless you count watching it as i walk to and from the kitchen. i “see” the game as it is on the television. i hear it.

          you know you won’t be lazy; i know you love to cook. i always think that too…like “oh, wouldn’t it be nice to bring food in” and then somehow my imaginary food reputation seems called into question. also it’s a good way to rack up some food for blog posts, or for me it is.

          • You’re right, I probably won’t be lazy. I don’t mind making the stuff, just the cleanup :p

            But, of course, every time I complain about the cleanup, my husband just says that he offered to keep it simple and buy some pizza, and that I create more work for myself.

            Sigh… It’s true, but that really doesn’t make me feel better! :)

          • shannon says:

            i knew it! and isn’t it always the cleanup, right? it’s like it takes three times as long as the actual food-making does. I do the same; it’s like i know it would be easier to just order pizza or get some things put together at our grocery (which has a fine catering department), but i cave into the “i’ll do it myself” every time.

            we are who we are, i guess. :)

  5. Oh man, this could just be my dinner tonight!

    • shannon says:

      sue, I should probably attach a warning to these; it’s amazing how much you’ll deny how many you’ve eaten. Because the pastry is so light, and they’re cut so cute, that you’ll be all “oh, i’ll just have a few…” and if you don’t watch it, you will eat SO MANY. I know…i’ve done it. :) Mr. Table still will not admit to how many he ate in one sitting when i first made them, and it’s been like, a YEAR of denial.

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